Must Read Rumors

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Meghan Markle was faced with the question that everyone is curious about.

Kate Middleton and Prince William to embark on royal tour of Poland and Germany

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The Duchess of Cambridge, née Kate Middleton, visited her former school in Berkshire. For the occasion, she unveiled the nicknames she and her sister Pippa had when they were children.

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The Duchess of Cambridge, née Kate Middleton, sported a simple but elegant look when she visited the Docklands Sailing and Watersports Centre in London this week.

Meghan Markle avoids Prince Harry questions at ATX panel
Kate Middleton and Prince William to embark on royal tour of Poland and Germany
Kate Middleton reveals her and Pippa’s nicknames in school
Duchess Kate shines in marine outfit at London event
Prince Harry reportedly received the Queen’s permission to marry Meghan Markle

Google has deleted the private data accidentally obtained from wireless networks in Austria, Denmark and Ireland

by Dan
June 12, 2010 at 8:00 pm

Google has deleted the private data accidentally obtained under the Street View program in Austria, Denmark and Ireland, the company said in a letter sent to U.S. congressmen, on Friday.

Google Inc. apologized again for collecting personal information of users using wireless networks, indicating that they were not used for any service or product group.

The letter, signed by Pablo Chavez, director of public policy at Google, is a response to questions from congressmen for Google Chairman, Eric Schmidt.

Google says that the cars used in Street View program, which go through city streets in more than 30 countries to obtain images, intercepted inadvertently personal informations sent through unsecured Wi-Fi networks.

“We deleted all the «payload» data identified as coming from Ireland, Denmark and Austria, at the request of authorities in these countries,” said Chavez, adding that data collected in the United States will continue to be stored because of court proceedings already in progress deployment.

Internet users in several U.S. states sued the company, seeking compensation for the damage suffered. The group is accused of having violated local and federal laws, but Chavez insisted that Google has not acted illegally. “We believe we have not violated U.S. law by collecting «payload» data, configured to be accessible (ie unencrypted and thus accessible to a user equipment),” he said.

Image source: theonion.com

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