Must Read Rumors

Kate Middleton and Prince William co-host BBC Radio 1 chart show

The royal spouses gave an interview to the BBC Radio 1 station, in which they revealed how their daily lives go by behind the doors of the Kensington Palace.

Kate Middleton, Prince William and Prince Harry share candid conversation about their struggles in new video

A short video shows the three royals opening up about their personal histories regarding mental health.

Kate Middleton proud of “brilliant” Prince Harry after opening up about Princess Diana’s death

Prince Harry’s confession about suffering after his mother’s death moved not only his audience, but his sister-in-law as well.

Kate Middleton admits motherhood can be “lonely”

Duchess Kate recently talked about the challenges faced by mothers.

Meghan Markle shuts down lifestyle blog The Tig

Prince Harry’s girlfriend announced on Friday that she finally pulled the plug on her lifestyle blog The Tig.

Kate Middleton and Prince William co-host BBC Radio 1 chart show
Kate Middleton, Prince William and Prince Harry share candid conversation about their struggles in new video
Kate Middleton proud of “brilliant” Prince Harry after opening up about Princess Diana’s death
Kate Middleton admits motherhood can be “lonely”
Meghan Markle shuts down lifestyle blog The Tig

Saliva test might be used to determine cancer in the future

by Nicole
September 6, 2011 at 3:06 am

Scientists have found a new way to determine the amount of potential carcinogens stuck to a person’s DNA.

Researchers at National Chung Cheng University (NCCU) in Taiwan have developed a new test that can help doctors diagnose and monitor diseases and their prevention.

“The test measures the amount of damaged DNA [DNA adducts] in a person’s body,” said Professor Hauh-Jyun Candy Chen, Ph.D., who led the research team, ”which may help doctors diagnose diseases, monitor how effective a treatment is and also recommend things high-risk patients can do to reduce the chances of actually getting a disease.”

DNA adducts are formed when a potential carcinogenic substance is attached to a strand of DNA.

People come into contact with such substances outdoors, at work or practicing certain activities such as smoking.

The new test measures the levels of five common DNA adducts, including some which are formed due to cigarette smoke.

DNA is present in white blood cells, which are normally found in saliva.

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