Must Read Rumors

Kate Middleton new pregnancy rumor isn’t ‘official’ yet

A new tabloid report claims that the royal mother-of-two is expecting.

Pippa Middleton and James Matthews’ wedding: all the details revealed

Kate Middleton’s younger sister married financier James Matthews at St. Mark’s Church in Englefield on Saturday in what has been dubbed “the wedding of the year.”

Pippa Middleton wedding: why Kate isn’t likely to be maid of honor

As the big day is getting near, the question of who will be Pippa’s maid of honor is gathering attention since it seems that Kate Middleton wont fill in that role.

Pippa Middleton wedding dress details revealed

A week from now Duchess Kate’s sister will be walking down the aisle and her gown will undoubtedly turn heads all over the world.

Kate Middleton stuns in blue coat during Luxembourg visit

On her first visit to Luxembourg, Duchess Kate stole everyone’s hearts.

Kate Middleton new pregnancy rumor isn’t ‘official’ yet
Pippa Middleton and James Matthews’ wedding: all the details revealed
Pippa Middleton wedding: why Kate isn’t likely to be maid of honor
Pippa Middleton wedding dress details revealed
Kate Middleton stuns in blue coat during Luxembourg visit

Saliva test might be used to determine cancer in the future

by Nicole
September 6, 2011 at 3:06 am

Scientists have found a new way to determine the amount of potential carcinogens stuck to a person’s DNA.

Researchers at National Chung Cheng University (NCCU) in Taiwan have developed a new test that can help doctors diagnose and monitor diseases and their prevention.

“The test measures the amount of damaged DNA [DNA adducts] in a person’s body,” said Professor Hauh-Jyun Candy Chen, Ph.D., who led the research team, ”which may help doctors diagnose diseases, monitor how effective a treatment is and also recommend things high-risk patients can do to reduce the chances of actually getting a disease.”

DNA adducts are formed when a potential carcinogenic substance is attached to a strand of DNA.

People come into contact with such substances outdoors, at work or practicing certain activities such as smoking.

The new test measures the levels of five common DNA adducts, including some which are formed due to cigarette smoke.

DNA is present in white blood cells, which are normally found in saliva.

What do you think? What is your gossip?

The rules: Keep it clean, stay on the subject and use English only - or we may delete your comment. If you see inappropriate language email us. Read our Terms and Conditions