Must Read Rumors

Kate Middleton and Prince William co-host BBC Radio 1 chart show

The royal spouses gave an interview to the BBC Radio 1 station, in which they revealed how their daily lives go by behind the doors of the Kensington Palace.

Kate Middleton, Prince William and Prince Harry share candid conversation about their struggles in new video

A short video shows the three royals opening up about their personal histories regarding mental health.

Kate Middleton proud of “brilliant” Prince Harry after opening up about Princess Diana’s death

Prince Harry’s confession about suffering after his mother’s death moved not only his audience, but his sister-in-law as well.

Kate Middleton admits motherhood can be “lonely”

Duchess Kate recently talked about the challenges faced by mothers.

Meghan Markle shuts down lifestyle blog The Tig

Prince Harry’s girlfriend announced on Friday that she finally pulled the plug on her lifestyle blog The Tig.

Kate Middleton and Prince William co-host BBC Radio 1 chart show
Kate Middleton, Prince William and Prince Harry share candid conversation about their struggles in new video
Kate Middleton proud of “brilliant” Prince Harry after opening up about Princess Diana’s death
Kate Middleton admits motherhood can be “lonely”
Meghan Markle shuts down lifestyle blog The Tig

Electrified roads for the cars of the future?

by Julia
September 16, 2011 at 5:50 am

The cars of the future could be powered by electrified roadways, which would in turn allow electric cars to forgo their heavy batteries.

Two Japanese researchers, Masahiro Hanazawa at Toyota’s central R&D Labs in Nagakute, Japan, and Takashi Ohira at Toyohashi University of Technology, argue that this technology would allow electric cars to give up their batteries, which not only hinder vehicles by increasing the amount of energy required to move, but also force it to stand still while recharging.

“Our approach exploits a pair of tyres, which are always touching a road surface,” Hanazawa says.

In order to test how much energy is lost when electricity travels through the tyres’ rubber, the two scientists have created a lab experiment, placing metal plates on the floor and inside a tyre.

“Less than 20 per cent of the transmitted power is dissipated in the circuit,” Ohira said.

Ohira explained that with enough energy, the system could power a typical classic car and his team is in the process of developing the first small-scale prototype to prove its efficiency.

What do you think? What is your gossip?

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