Must Read Rumors

Kate Middleton, Prince William and Prince Harry set to be part of mental health documentary

The royal trio will reportedly take part in a mental health documentary for their mental health campaign.

Kate Middleton will visit EACH hospice at Quidenham

The Duchess of Cambridge, née Kate Middleton, is set to visit East Anglia’s Children’s Quidenham hospice for the first time this month.

Kate Middleton at first 2017 engagement: ‘Parenting is tough’

The Duchess of Cambridge, née Kate Middleton, recently visited the Anna Freud Centre for Children and Families that focuses on early intervention for young children with mental health issues.

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle spent first holiday together in Norway

For their first vacation as a couple, Prince Harry and Meghan Markle flew to Norway to admire the Northern Lights.

Kate Middleton and Prince William’s 2016 Christmas card revealed

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, née Kate Middleton, have released their official holiday card.

Kate Middleton, Prince William and Prince Harry set to be part of mental health documentary
Kate Middleton will visit EACH hospice at Quidenham
Kate Middleton at first 2017 engagement: ‘Parenting is tough’
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle spent first holiday together in Norway
Kate Middleton and Prince William’s 2016 Christmas card revealed

Electrified roads for the cars of the future?

by Julia
September 16, 2011 at 5:50 am

The cars of the future could be powered by electrified roadways, which would in turn allow electric cars to forgo their heavy batteries.

Two Japanese researchers, Masahiro Hanazawa at Toyota’s central R&D Labs in Nagakute, Japan, and Takashi Ohira at Toyohashi University of Technology, argue that this technology would allow electric cars to give up their batteries, which not only hinder vehicles by increasing the amount of energy required to move, but also force it to stand still while recharging.

“Our approach exploits a pair of tyres, which are always touching a road surface,” Hanazawa says.

In order to test how much energy is lost when electricity travels through the tyres’ rubber, the two scientists have created a lab experiment, placing metal plates on the floor and inside a tyre.

“Less than 20 per cent of the transmitted power is dissipated in the circuit,” Ohira said.

Ohira explained that with enough energy, the system could power a typical classic car and his team is in the process of developing the first small-scale prototype to prove its efficiency.

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