live keynote next week.

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Tori Spelling confirms Dean McDermott’s leaving the show
iPhone 6S/iPhone 7 rumors: Foxconn could open new sapphire display factory
Bill Cosby’s nephew defends him against accusations of molestation
Jennifer Aniston talks wedding rumors, mocks Kim Kardashian
Former NBC employee Frank Scotti reveals he paid off women for Bill Cosby

iPhone 5 release date: fake invites to Apple media event?

by Nicole
September 8, 2012 at 6:32 am

A new report casts doubt on the authenticity of Apple’s invites to its live keynote next week.

Allyson Kazmucha at iMore fears that the invites that were recently sent by the company could actually be fake, especially as fraudsters are likely to take advantage of the hype surrounding the highly-anticipated device.

She notes that the source of the email and the links they contain are important in tracking false messages.

Posting a screenshot of the email she received, Kazmucha writes that the message was sent to a general public inbox and not to her iMore e-mail, as it usually happens with an Apple announcement.

In addition, the domain that the mail was coming from wasn’t just apple.com and the link pointed to a “strange tracking website.”

Kazmucha concludes that it is always advisable to be aware of these facts when it comes to important emails.

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