Must Read Rumors

Kate Middleton and Prince William co-host BBC Radio 1 chart show

The royal spouses gave an interview to the BBC Radio 1 station, in which they revealed how their daily lives go by behind the doors of the Kensington Palace.

Kate Middleton, Prince William and Prince Harry share candid conversation about their struggles in new video

A short video shows the three royals opening up about their personal histories regarding mental health.

Kate Middleton proud of “brilliant” Prince Harry after opening up about Princess Diana’s death

Prince Harry’s confession about suffering after his mother’s death moved not only his audience, but his sister-in-law as well.

Kate Middleton admits motherhood can be “lonely”

Duchess Kate recently talked about the challenges faced by mothers.

Meghan Markle shuts down lifestyle blog The Tig

Prince Harry’s girlfriend announced on Friday that she finally pulled the plug on her lifestyle blog The Tig.

Kate Middleton and Prince William co-host BBC Radio 1 chart show
Kate Middleton, Prince William and Prince Harry share candid conversation about their struggles in new video
Kate Middleton proud of “brilliant” Prince Harry after opening up about Princess Diana’s death
Kate Middleton admits motherhood can be “lonely”
Meghan Markle shuts down lifestyle blog The Tig

MIT builds camera that capture the speed of light in slow motion

by Nicole
December 13, 2011 at 5:41 pm

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have created a camera that captures 1 trillion frames per second.

The device can track the movement of individual packets of light, or photons, so fast that you can visualize the propagation of light.

“We have built a virtual slow motion camera where we can see photons, or light particles through space,” says Associate Professor Ramesh Raskar in an interview.

“Photons travel about a million times photons travel a million times faster than bullets. So our camera can see photons, or bullets of light traveling through space.”

In order to perform the experiment, the scientists used a streak camera, which is normally used to measure the intensity and duration of light.

By modifying the equipment, the researchers managed to create slow-motion movies.

The technique used cameras and mirrors to build these slow motion clips that track the lights movement across a scene. A laser pulse was shut as a flash and the light was recorded at about 1 trillion FPS.

The experiment thus had to be replicated hundreds of times.

The technology can be applied in medical imaging, materials science, as well as chemical analysis.

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