Must Read Rumors

iPhone 6 leaked photos show volume/power flex cable, SIM card tray

With the iPhone 6 release date approaching, leaks about the device’s internal components and batteries keep surfacing.

iPhone 6 leaked photos show bare logic boards

New images displaying the logic boards of both the 4.7-inch and 5.5-inch iPhones surfaced online on Monday.

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A release of the two Apple products during the holiday season isn’t very probable, a new article suggests.

5.5-inch iPhone 6, iWatch release date rumors: likely in December?

New rumors appearing in the blogosphere suggest that the phablet iPhone 6 and the rumored iWatch could arrive during the holiday season.

iPhone 6 rumors: photos show logic board, NFC support possible

The iPhone 6 has entered production stage two months before its rumored released date, and internal components continue to leak online.

iPhone 6 leaked photos show volume/power flex cable, SIM card tray
iPhone 6 leaked photos show bare logic boards
5.5-inch iPhone 6, iWatch release date in December reportedly unlikely
5.5-inch iPhone 6, iWatch release date rumors: likely in December?
iPhone 6 rumors: photos show logic board, NFC support possible

MIT builds camera that capture the speed of light in slow motion

by Nicole
December 13, 2011 at 5:41 pm

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have created a camera that captures 1 trillion frames per second.

The device can track the movement of individual packets of light, or photons, so fast that you can visualize the propagation of light.

“We have built a virtual slow motion camera where we can see photons, or light particles through space,” says Associate Professor Ramesh Raskar in an interview.

“Photons travel about a million times photons travel a million times faster than bullets. So our camera can see photons, or bullets of light traveling through space.”

In order to perform the experiment, the scientists used a streak camera, which is normally used to measure the intensity and duration of light.

By modifying the equipment, the researchers managed to create slow-motion movies.

The technique used cameras and mirrors to build these slow motion clips that track the lights movement across a scene. A laser pulse was shut as a flash and the light was recorded at about 1 trillion FPS.

The experiment thus had to be replicated hundreds of times.

The technology can be applied in medical imaging, materials science, as well as chemical analysis.

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