Stephen Hawking says the universe was “not necessary” created by God

In the new book, Stephen Hawking argues that the Big Bang was inevitable due to the law of gravity, rather than occurring following the intervention of a divine being.

22 years ago, in 1988, Hawking had a slightly different approach. In his book “A Brief History of Time” he had seemed to accept the role of God in the creation of the universe. “If we discover a complete theory, it would be the ultimate triumph of human reason – for then we should know the mind of God.”

“The Grand Design”, an extract of which appears in the Times today, contests Sir Isaac Newton’s belief that the universe must have been designed by God as it could not have been created out of chaos.

“Because there is a law such as gravity, the universe can and will create itself from nothing,” he writes. “Spontaneous creation is the reason there is something rather than nothing, why the universe exists, why we exist.

“It is not necessary to invoke God to light the blue touch paper and set the universe going.”

“The fact that we human beings – who are ourselves mere collections of fundamental particles of nature – have been able to come this close to an understanding of the laws governing us and our universe is a great triumph.”

Hawking says the first blow to Newton’s belief that the universe could not have arisen from chaos was the observation in 1992 of a planet orbiting a star other than our Sun. “That makes the coincidences of our planetary conditions – the single sun, the lucky combination of Earth-sun distance and solar mass – far less remarkable, and far less compelling as evidence that the Earth was carefully designed just to please us human beings,” he writes.

Experts discovered the code of Michelangelo hidden in the Sistine Chapel.


Michelangelo is recognized as one of the greatest Italian Renaissance painter and sculptor. What we don’t know much about him is that he was extremely passionate about anatomy and that, at one point, he persuaded a hospital to let him study the corpses. But he destroyed almost all the notes and anatomical drawings.

A couple of American neuroanatomic experts believe that Michelangelo left some anatomical illustrations behind one of his best known works, the Sistine Chapel.

The artist painted his masterpiece between 1508 and 1512 in Rome and since then has been admired by millions of tourists.

Ian Suk and Rafel Tamargo think the last scene of the Chapel ceiling, in which God separates light from dark with his hands very precisely depicts the spinal cord and brainstem.

They observed that God’s neck and chest shows anatomical irregularities, not present in other paintings of the Chapel, and are differently enlightened, on purpose.

Experts overlapped the neck from the painting over a photograph of the human brain. Surprise: the two images matched perfectly! They have added a piece of God’s clothing that fits well with the spinal cord.

The two experts say that Michelangelo created this info as a secret message of the painting, but could not say what it means.

Dr. R. Douglas Fields from the University of Maryland, said that it could be several interpretations.

“Maybe the paintings from the Sistine Chapel doesn’t show that God gives Adam’s intelligence but that intelligence, observation and body that makes them possible, are directly from God and not mediated by the church,” said Fields. Michelangelo hated opulence and corruption of the Catholic Church.

The doctor says that the painting could be a Rorshach test, ie: an image that says more about the viewer and not the author, so it’s no wonder that experts in anatomy saw anatomical drawings in Michelangelo’s paintings.

Image source: dailymail.co.uk