Facebook founder, Mark Zuckerberg is the most influential man in the world

The first place is the famous founder of site Facebook – Mark Zuckerberg, followed by the father of Apple, Steve Jobs.

Moreover, the top ten of Vanity Fair is dominated by people from the new generation of Internet.

In third place were Google founders, Sergey Brin, Larry Page and Eric Schmidt, in fifth place – Amazon founder Jeff Bezos and the ninth – the founders of Twitter, Evan Williams and Biz Stone.

If actor Johnny Depp and singer Lady Gaga were on 20th place, 23th respectively in the top, other stars included in the rank was actor and producer Tom Hanks, on 25, followed by stand-up comedy actor Jon Stewart, on 29, and famous television star Oprah Winfrey on 34.

Also, U2 frontman Bono came immediately after Oprah, and Canadian director James Cameron, who had record revenue this year with “Avatar”, came in 36th position.

Rapper Jay-Z ranked 58th, followed at short distance by the actor, director and producer George Clooney, on 66, while the couple Angelina Jolie, Brad Pitt ranked No. 75.

The best ranked designer in the top was Ralph Lauren on the 16th place, followed by Karl Lagerfeld – the 39, Prada (56) and Burberry owners (61). John Galliano from Dior was ranked 91st.

Image source: techdigest.tv

Adobe moves on in dispute with Apple

“They’ve chosen to keep their system closed and we’d rather work with partners who are interested in working with us.

“We believe in open systems. We believe in the power of the internet and in customers making choices and I think a lot of the controversy was about their decision at that point. They’ve made their choice. We’ve made ours and we’ve moved on.

“It’s a business decision. With the energy and innovation that our company has, we’d rather focus on people who want to deliver the best experience with Flash and there are so many of them.”

The dispute between the two companies came to a head in late April when Apple CEO Steve Jobs posted an open letter describing his “Thoughts on Flash” and outlining the controversy from his point of view. Narayan quickly responded in his company’s defense, attempting to contrast Apple’s “closed” ecosystem with the multi-platform, “open” stance taken by Adobe.

The U.S. Federal Trade Commission and the European Commission are currently pursuing an investigation of Apple over its business practices with respect to Flash technology.

iPhone 4 latest important accessory

Rivers of ink have flowed about iPhone’s problems with its reception, there is no secret to anyone. The jokes about the magic phone do not stop. The newest joke about it is the End Call sticker.

The idea is simple: stick it in the area where it is known that, if the hand is held, it decreases the signal and interrupt calls. Stick your stickers and have a virtual end call button.

The manufacturer knows that Apple fans are not saving money when it comes to iPhone. Therefore, he demands for this small sticker no less than 29 dollars.

Image source: Go4it

Steve Jobs knew about iPhone’s problems in April, before launching

On the other hand, the latest information inside Apple say that Steve Jobs was aware of the problems with the signal. He was warned by a chief of engineers, Ruben Caballero. He told Steve Jobs that while not sacrificing the chosen design, there will be signal problems.

Steve Jobs, however, like a boss who knows them all better than anyone, has chosen to ignore the warning. Considering that iPhone’s design is very important and that “small detail” like its reception cannot stand in their way, decided not to change anything.

And so it was a situation where many users are very unhappy, and Apple shares began to fall.

Image source: Go4it

iPhone 4G in stores starting June 24

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Starting June 15, we’ll be able to do pre-orders for the new iPhone, and from June 24 appears in the Apple stores in the U.S., France, Germany, Britain and Japan.

From July the iPhone 4G will be available in Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Finland, Hong Kong, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland, and from August (24 countries) and September (44 countries) will have it ready in stores for potential buyers.

Also, as Steve Jobs told in the official announcement, the iPhone 4G will have over 100 new features, besides its revolutionary design that we learned when the new phone prototype was lost in a bar a few months ago.

Jobs claimed also that it has the most beautiful thing ever Apple made and that the new iPhone glass that covers both front and rear is very solid. In addition, only 9.3 mm thick, being the thinnest smartphone in the world and integrated antennas, “something that was never ever made,” said Apple’s chairman.

iPhone will be available in two colors, black and white, and will have a special screen, called Retina Display, which has a significant increase in the number of pixels. “The phone’s display has 326 pixels per inch. No other phone has such a display.”

This time, Apple focused heavily on battery which is much improved over previous versions, lasting up to 300 hours on standby and talk time up to 7hrs.

To have an idea of the price of this new device, the new iPhone will cost U.S. $ 199 for the 16GB version and $ 299 for the 32GB.

Obviously, 3GS iPhone price will drop after the commercial launch of the iPhone in April, and the phone’s 3G version will be removed from the market.

A list of technical specifications of the new iPhone can be found on Apple’s official website.

iPhone 4G could be launched Monday

All eyes will be on Steve Jobs which will have his regular speech in the first part of the conference. Every analyst expects – with this occasion – the launch of the 4th iPhone generation.

Apple announced that it will give to all the stakeholders the opportunity to talk to its developers about the new iPhone OS 4.0. Analysts hope that Steve Jobs will show the iPhone 4G terminal.

iPhone 4G has a new design, being less rounded and having an aluminum frame. Also is 3 grams heavier and the battery is 16% higher.

Steve Jobs: Thoughts on Flash

Apple has a long relationship with Adobe. In fact, we met Adobe’s founders when they were in their proverbial garage. Apple was their first big customer, adopting their Postscript language for our new Laserwriter printer. Apple invested in Adobe and owned around 20% of the company for many years. The two companies worked closely together to pioneer desktop publishing and there were many good times. Since that golden era, the companies have grown apart. Apple went through its near death experience, and Adobe was drawn to the corporate market with their Acrobat products. Today the two companies still work together to serve their joint creative customers – Mac users buy around half of Adobe’s Creative Suite products – but beyond that there are few joint interests.

I wanted to jot down some of our thoughts on Adobe’s Flash products so that customers and critics may better understand why we do not allow Flash on iPhones, iPods and iPads. Adobe has characterized our decision as being primarily business driven – they say we want to protect our App Store – but in reality it is based on technology issues. Adobe claims that we are a closed system, and that Flash is open, but in fact the opposite is true. Let me explain.

First, there’s “Open”.

Adobe’s Flash products are 100% proprietary. They are only available from Adobe, and Adobe has sole authority as to their future enhancement, pricing, etc. While Adobe’s Flash products are widely available, this does not mean they are open, since they are controlled entirely by Adobe and available only from Adobe. By almost any definition, Flash is a closed system.

Apple has many proprietary products too. Though the operating system for the iPhone, iPod and iPad is proprietary, we strongly believe that all standards pertaining to the web should be open. Rather than use Flash, Apple has adopted HTML5, CSS and JavaScript – all open standards. Apple’s mobile devices all ship with high performance, low power implementations of these open standards. HTML5, the new web standard that has been adopted by Apple, Google and many others, lets web developers create advanced graphics, typography, animations and transitions without relying on third party browser plug-ins (like Flash). HTML5 is completely open and controlled by a standards committee, of which Apple is a member.

Apple even creates open standards for the web. For example, Apple began with a small open source project and created WebKit, a complete open-source HTML5 rendering engine that is the heart of the Safari web browser used in all our products. WebKit has been widely adopted. Google uses it for Android’s browser, Palm uses it, Nokia uses it, and RIM (Blackberry) has announced they will use it too. Almost every smartphone web browser other than Microsoft’s uses WebKit. By making its WebKit technology open, Apple has set the standard for mobile web browsers.

Second, there’s the “full web”.

Adobe has repeatedly said that Apple mobile devices cannot access “the full web” because 75% of video on the web is in Flash. What they don’t say is that almost all this video is also available in a more modern format, H.264, and viewable on iPhones, iPods and iPads. YouTube, with an estimated 40% of the web’s video, shines in an app bundled on all Apple mobile devices, with the iPad offering perhaps the best YouTube discovery and viewing experience ever. Add to this video from Vimeo, Netflix, Facebook, ABC, CBS, CNN, MSNBC, Fox News, ESPN, NPR, Time, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Sports Illustrated, People, National Geographic, and many, many others. iPhone, iPod and iPad users aren’t missing much video.

Another Adobe claim is that Apple devices cannot play Flash games. This is true. Fortunately, there are over 50,000 games and entertainment titles on the App Store, and many of them are free. There are more games and entertainment titles available for iPhone, iPod and iPad than for any other platform in the world.

Third, there’s reliability, security and performance.

Symantec recently highlighted Flash for having one of the worst security records in 2009. We also know first hand that Flash is the number one reason Macs crash. We have been working with Adobe to fix these problems, but they have persisted for several years now. We don’t want to reduce the reliability and security of our iPhones, iPods and iPads by adding Flash.

In addition, Flash has not performed well on mobile devices. We have routinely asked Adobe to show us Flash performing well on a mobile device, any mobile device, for a few years now. We have never seen it. Adobe publicly said that Flash would ship on a smartphone in early 2009, then the second half of 2009, then the first half of 2010, and now they say the second half of 2010. We think it will eventually ship, but we’re glad we didn’t hold our breath. Who knows how it will perform?

Fourth, there’s battery life.

To achieve long battery life when playing video, mobile devices must decode the video in hardware; decoding it in software uses too much power. Many of the chips used in modern mobile devices contain a decoder called H.264 – an industry standard that is used in every Blu-ray DVD player and has been adopted by Apple, Google (YouTube), Vimeo, Netflix and many other companies.

Although Flash has recently added support for H.264, the video on almost all Flash websites currently requires an older generation decoder that is not implemented in mobile chips and must be run in software. The difference is striking: on an iPhone, for example, H.264 videos play for up to 10 hours, while videos decoded in software play for less than 5 hours before the battery is fully drained.

When websites re-encode their videos using H.264, they can offer them without using Flash at all. They play perfectly in browsers like Apple’s Safari and Google’s Chrome without any plugins whatsoever, and look great on iPhones, iPods and iPads.

Fifth, there’s Touch.

Flash was designed for PCs using mice, not for touch screens using fingers. For example, many Flash websites rely on “rollovers”, which pop up menus or other elements when the mouse arrow hovers over a specific spot. Apple’s revolutionary multi-touch interface doesn’t use a mouse, and there is no concept of a rollover. Most Flash websites will need to be rewritten to support touch-based devices. If developers need to rewrite their Flash websites, why not use modern technologies like HTML5, CSS and JavaScript?

Even if iPhones, iPods and iPads ran Flash, it would not solve the problem that most Flash websites need to be rewritten to support touch-based devices.

Sixth, the most important reason.

Besides the fact that Flash is closed and proprietary, has major technical drawbacks, and doesn’t support touch based devices, there is an even more important reason we do not allow Flash on iPhones, iPods and iPads. We have discussed the downsides of using Flash to play video and interactive content from websites, but Adobe also wants developers to adopt Flash to create apps that run on our mobile devices.

We know from painful experience that letting a third party layer of software come between the platform and the developer ultimately results in sub-standard apps and hinders the enhancement and progress of the platform. If developers grow dependent on third party development libraries and tools, they can only take advantage of platform enhancements if and when the third party chooses to adopt the new features. We cannot be at the mercy of a third party deciding if and when they will make our enhancements available to our developers.

This becomes even worse if the third party is supplying a cross platform development tool. The third party may not adopt enhancements from one platform unless they are available on all of their supported platforms. Hence developers only have access to the lowest common denominator set of features. Again, we cannot accept an outcome where developers are blocked from using our innovations and enhancements because they are not available on our competitor’s platforms.

Flash is a cross platform development tool. It is not Adobe’s goal to help developers write the best iPhone, iPod and iPad apps. It is their goal to help developers write cross platform apps. And Adobe has been painfully slow to adopt enhancements to Apple’s platforms. For example, although Mac OS X has been shipping for almost 10 years now, Adobe just adopted it fully (Cocoa) two weeks ago when they shipped CS5. Adobe was the last major third party developer to fully adopt Mac OS X.

Our motivation is simple – we want to provide the most advanced and innovative platform to our developers, and we want them to stand directly on the shoulders of this platform and create the best apps the world has ever seen. We want to continually enhance the platform so developers can create even more amazing, powerful, fun and useful applications. Everyone wins – we sell more devices because we have the best apps, developers reach a wider and wider audience and customer base, and users are continually delighted by the best and broadest selection of apps on any platform.

Conclusions.

Flash was created during the PC era – for PCs and mice. Flash is a successful business for Adobe, and we can understand why they want to push it beyond PCs. But the mobile era is about low power devices, touch interfaces and open web standards – all areas where Flash falls short.

The avalanche of media outlets offering their content for Apple’s mobile devices demonstrates that Flash is no longer necessary to watch video or consume any kind of web content. And the 200,000 apps on Apple’s App Store proves that Flash isn’t necessary for tens of thousands of developers to create graphically rich applications, including games.

New open standards created in the mobile era, such as HTML5, will win on mobile devices (and PCs too). Perhaps Adobe should focus more on creating great HTML5 tools for the future, and less on criticizing Apple for leaving the past behind.

Steve Jobs
April, 2010

The trial versions of Adobe CS5 can now be downloaded

Users can either download the entire suite or only a particular application.

While we are talking about trial versions, their size is quite large.

Those users who have not a very fast connection must know that only Photoshop has about 1 GB. The entire suite reaches 4.5 GB.

In the clip below you can see all the Photoshop CS5 news.

Even if the voice is not of Steve Jobs, the word “amazing” is heard every few seconds in the video.

Apple iPhone 3GS had huge sales

In short, Steve Jobs’s people have made lots and lots of money.

But more interesting are figures relating to iPhone sales.

In the second fiscal quarter of the year, Apple has sold no less than 8.75 million copies of iPhone.

Compared with the 3.79 million sold during the same period last year, the American company grew 130% strict on this segment.

Overall, from the launch moment of the first version of the iPhone, were sold 51.15 million copies.

Billionaires Steve Jobs and Eric Schmidt are good friends at a coffee

Apparently they were having a nice cup of coffee along with a – most likely – interesting conversation.

Steve Jobs on the left and Eric Schmidt on the right

After all, Schmidt used to be on Apple’s board. But ever since he stepped down (and actually before he did), the growing animosity between the two formerly close companies has been apparent.

Gizmodo’s tipster saw them and snapped these shots, and noted that the cafe is owned and operated by former Google chef Charlie Ayers. Overheard from the conversation were two lines by Jobs. Enthusiastically, “They’re going to see it all eventually so who cares how they get it.” Which seemed to be about web content, said the tipster. And, “Let’s go discuss this somewhere more private,” after they noticed the crowd gathering around. Brian Lam from Gizmodo thinks that was probably a wise move. Schmidt was very quiet, listening, and Jobs was doing a lot of the talking. What do you make of the body language? And what’s that black thing on the table? No, it’s not an iPad. It’s a menu. Tipster says the first thing he looked for was an iPad, and that isn’t it.

Steve Jobs on the left and Eric Schmidt on the right

On August 3rd, 2009 Apple released this announcement:

Apple today announced that Dr. Eric Schmidt, chief executive officer of Google, is resigning from Apple’s Board of Directors, a position he has held since August 2006.

“Eric has been an excellent Board member for Apple, investing his valuable time, talent, passion and wisdom to help make Apple successful,” said Steve Jobs, Apple’s CEO. “Unfortunately, as Google enters more of Apple’s core businesses, with Android and now Chrome OS, Eric’s effectiveness as an Apple Board member will be significantly diminished, since he will have to recuse himself from even larger portions of our meetings due to potential conflicts of interest. Therefore, we have mutually decided that now is the right time for Eric to resign his position on Apple’s Board.”

Shortly afterward Google provided with the following statement from Schmidt:

I have very much enjoyed my time on the Apple Board. It’s a fantastic company. But as Apple explained today we’ve agreed it makes sense for me to step down now.

Steve Jobs car

Images: Gizmodo